The Widdershins

Archive for the ‘Things I’d like to forget’ Category

Dear Donald…

Love and light to all of us today, Widdershins. Let us hope that we make it through whatever evil has been planned or conceived to be wrought upon this occasion of pure joy and hope.

Because it should be nothing but joy and hope. It should be an occasion we are all unequivocally celebrating. We should all be drunk on champagne at noon ET. But we can’t let out our collective breaths till we know our President, Madam Vice President Kamala, and new Senators Jon Ossoff, Raphael Warnock and Alex Padilla are sworn in.

Please, Goddess, please let the inauguration happen without another horror being perpetrated. Please. I don’t think we can take any more.

Open thread of course.

MB had a busy weekend what with celebrating her hubby’s birthday so I’m doing a post for her today.  I thought I would continue with the theme of our musical post from the weekend but on a more serious note.

Dr. John Gartner is a psychiatrist who specializes in the treatment of borderline personality disorder, bipolar disorder, and depression. He’s also been an assistant professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Medical School.  Further, he and a host of other mental health professionals believe it is time to do away with the Goldwater Rule.  Here are the basics of the Goldwater Rule:

that states it is unethical for psychiatrists to give a professional opinion about public figures they have not examined in person, and from whom they have not obtained consent to discuss their mental health in public statements. It is named after presidential candidate Barry Goldwater.

However, Dr. Garnter and these other professionals believe that the Goldwater Rule is no longer valid or applicable.  One of the reasons they cite is the Tarasoff V Regents of University of California case and the subsequent “duty to warn” if an individual poses a threat to another individual.

Collectively these mental health professionals have formed an organization called Duty To Warn. This is how they phrase it on their website, which is now on our sidebar under Politics:

Mental-health professionals are mandated reporters with a duty to warn our patients and the community around us if we feel there is a potential danger. In this case, we collectively feel there a a duty to warn the public of the threat Donald Trump poses both to our nation and the planet.

We already know that outgoing Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee has referred to the White House as an adult day care center.  Then a few days later there was the piece in Vanity Fair where Gabe Sherman reported on the fits that Trump has thrown saying “I hate everyone in the White House” (no reports on whether he stomped his feet when saying it).  Sherman cited his White House sources:

In recent days, I spoke with a half dozen prominent Republicans and Trump advisers, and they all describe a White House in crisis as advisers struggle to contain a president who seems to be increasingly unfocused and consumed by dark moods. Trump’s ire is being fueled by his stalled legislative agenda and, to a surprising degree, by his decision last month to back the losing candidate Luther Strange in the Alabama Republican primary. “Alabama was a huge blow to his psyche,” a person close to Trump said. “He saw the cult of personality was broken.”

Hmmm…”cult of personality”.  Personality…perhaps a malignant narcissistic personality?

“Malignant Narcissism: Collision of Two Personality Disorders The intentional destruction of others while pathologically loving self”

However you wish to phrase it, that is basically what Gartner and his colleagues wish to address under the 25th Amendment.

The removal of Trump using the Twenty-fifth Amendment is the aim of a newly launched social movement composed of mental-health professionals. The group, called Duty to Warn, claims that Donald Trump “suffers from an incurable malignant narcissism that makes him incapable of carrying out his presidential duties and poses a danger to the nation.” On Saturday Oct 14th, the organization held coördinated kickoff events in fourteen cities, where mental-health experts spoke out about Trump’s dangerousness and, in several, took to the streets in organized funereal marches, complete with drum corps.

We already know that according to a Quinnipiac poll in September that 56 percent said that Trump was “not fit to serve” and  57 percent disapprove of the job he’s doing as President.

Now about that Goldwater Rule thing.  Here’s some more info on that and recent attempts to do away with it:

Earlier this year, in response to members’ questions and discontent about the Goldwater Rule’s application with respect to Trump, the A.P.A. debated the issue and announced that not just diagnoses but any “opinion about the affect, behavior, speech, or other presentation of an individual that draws on the skills, training, expertise, and/or knowledge inherent in the practice of psychiatry” was off limits. (bolding mine)

So why keep the rule in place?  Psychiatrist John Zinner:

told me of a meeting he attended in March of the Washington Psychiatric Society, where a “high official” of the A.P.A. defended keeping the Goldwater Rule in place, on the theory that if psychiatrists spoke out against Trump the government would retaliate by reducing reimbursements to doctors for psychiatric treatment. “It was really not out of ethical concern,” Zinner said, but, rather, concern for “our pocketbooks.” (bolding mine)

Always the almighty dollar.

The group Duty To Warn has also announced formation of a PAC which “which will raise money for political candidates to run on the very issue of removing Trump via the Twenty-fifth Amendment.”

The group also has created a thirty minute video which you can watch here.  I didn’t want to embed the clip because it does run so long.

I’m sorry dear Widdershins to start your day and week off with such a bummer topic but it’s a Monday and it was going to be a bummer anyway.

So what’s on your minds today?

 

Katrina Satellite image offshore

It’s not as though I needed a reminder of what this day is.  I will most likely have it and the memories in my mind until the day I die, that is if I keep my mind and don’t slip into a senile, demented old age.  It’s all just clear as a bell.

On Friday the 26th of August 2005 I was at work in the Ops Control Center at USDA’s National Finance Center in New Orleans.  We had these big monitors at the front of the room that we could all see from our workstations.  They showed the status of the IDMS databases, the CICS online systems, and various other systems that we kept track of.  But we had one monitor that had a tv tuner attached to it and we had The Weather Channel on that one.  And what I saw on that channel began to scare me terribly.  Hurricane Katrina had already crossed Florida and was supposed to turn up the peninsula of Florida but it wasn’t doing that.  It was staying out in the Gulf and the weather people were talking about it possibly heading toward the central Gulf and perhaps Louisiana.  We already had Tropical Storm (later reclassified as a Cat 1 hurricane) Cindy pass through and we didn’t have power for two days.  The power situation was hit and miss and it was available in other parts of St. Bernard, including a hotel.  I tried talking the momster into us going there so I could leave her someplace with a.c. so I could go to work.  She refused and there was no way I could leave her in a house without a.c. by herself.

So with Cindy in mind and watching Katrina not doing what she was supposed to do, I got on the phone and started calling hotels out of the area.  Previously we had evacuated to Meridian Mississippi.  It was about 150-200 miles inland and had always worked out satisfactorily before, well out of the way of any

TIMES-PICAYUNE FILE PHOTO/TED JACKSON A cross stands out in the Mississippi River Gult Outlet at Shell Beach as part of the St. Bernard Katrina memorial.

Katrina cross in the MRGO commemorates the 180 people who died in St. Bernard parish

possible water or flooding and the hotel we used accepted pets because we had Chloe with us.  I called the place and there was “no room at the inn”.  So I had to start looking online for hotels there that were pet friendly.  I found one that looked acceptable so I called and booked us two rooms for, I think, 4 days.  We(my Dad and I) never thought as much about getting out of the path of a hurricane as much as we thought of just getting out of the immediate area.  Obviously the idea of levees being breached and floodwalls collapsing never crossed my mind.  So then I called the momster and in my sternest voice told her we had to get ready to leave for Katrina.  I was surprised when she said okay because she had watched the news on tv also.  (big sigh of relief from me!)

That evening I started boarding up windows and putting things away that were in the yard and on the

Memorial plaque with the names of those in SBP that died in the storm.

Memorial plaque with the names of those in SBP that died in the storm.

patio so there would be no flying projectiles when the winds hit.  Saturday I ran errands before getting ready to leave and then spent Saturday evening loading up the Expedition.  We left out Sunday morning and I was concerned about my neighbors because two families of them decided they would ride out the storm there.  That morning I found out  that one of families had decided to leave and that was a relief for me.  After following the news and weather I was awfully concerned about anyone staying behind.

We got to Meridian and the hotel and I was surprised at the number of Louisiana tags in the parking lot and then even more surprised when I found out that many of the people were fellow residents from “da parish”.  We watched the news as they showed Katrina hitting Louisiana and then as it moved inland.  Then we watched as it was approaching Mississippi and I realized the winds weren’t really dying down

A flooded Judge Perez Dr. in Chalmette LA.

A flooded Judge Perez Dr. in Chalmette LA.

much.  I found out later that winds in Meridian got up to 100 mph (I figured this out as I watched pieces of the

hotel next to us break off and fly around).  We lost power there and didn’t get it back for two days.  Meanwhile I was checking with people around the hotel to see if anyone had news from the parish.  Gradually folks started getting some news.  We knew the city had been flooded…we all sat around in shock just watching the videos that were coming in.  But then I started hearing that the levees on the MRGO that protected St. Bernard had failed.  Chalmette was flooded, with some places having water over the roofs.

The storm surge comes through the MRGO overtopping the levees.

The storm surge comes through the MRGO overtopping the levees.

In the picture above I can’t give anything for a reference except to say the tall things there are the supports for a four-laned Interstate type bridge that crosses over the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet.  Obviously those are telephone poles and trees in the front.  Normally the MRGO was so placid people would go out there in flat boats to fish.

All I can say is that for days there was a bunch of people who were milling around a hotel with no power, hotter than hell , just wondering what had happened to their homes.  We were getting no news about our parish because the bigger disaster was what was happening in New Orleans.  Then news started trickling in as I wrote above.

I’m going to wrap this up with something from The Rude Pundit because writing about “the thing” as Chris Rose referred to it is not something I really want to relive again.

“I don’t wanna write about that. I’m tired of thinking about it,” said one of the Rude Pundit’s New Orleans friends when he asked the woman to post on this here blog about the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the storm that caused the levees in New Orleans to break, allowing cataclysmic, murderous floods to ravage that place and many others. “Why does it matter that it’s been ten years? Every day is another anniversary.” Her family had lost three Katrina shrimp Boat Chalmetteor four houses between all the members. She lived a damn nightmare.

He reached out to another buddy, an old friend, a writer and photographer, who responded, “I’m just keeping my head low and not following it at all. It makes me crazy.” He meant that it depressed the hell out of him, and it was hard to blame him. He had been chased out of his home by the storm and came back to help rebuild the town. – See more at: http://rudepundit.blogspot.com/2015/08/not-katrina-anniversary-post.html#sthash.NaWKKbPo.dpuf

And that’s sorta the way I feel too.  We were fortunate in that we had “only” about five to six feet of water in the house and it did not come up in a violent matter.  The house is structurally sound and is secured, just waiting there for the rebuild.

But as Rude Pundit’s friends said, “I don’t wanna talk about it”.  Sometimes wounds take forever to heal and sometimes they don’t heal at all.

When I first saw someone post this song online, after the storm, I was sitting in the Birmingham area, where I am now, and just completely broke down.  I had a bottle of Seagrams 7 near me and just started slugging the shit.  The guy wasn’t even from La, but he knew…he knew.  I sat there slugging and snuffling until I got loaded enough to fall asleep.

It’s an open thread and comment however you’d like.  And writing about this has made me have to take a half of a xanax.


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