The Widdershins

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Just in time for Independence Day, NBC News wrote an article about the excavation of Sally Hemmings‘ living quarters at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello plantation. The byline reads: “Thomas Jefferson’s mistress Sally Hemings’ secret living quarters finally discovered.” NBC’s use of the word “mistress” is unfortunate. Hemmings was a slave. She was 14 years old when Jefferson first raped her. What editor wrote this byline without a bolt of lighting striking them down?

We are living in a diseased world. Trump himself is not the disease, he is a symptom. He used the disease of misogyny, racism, homophobia, etc., to get himself elected. He launched his campaign by declaring all Mexicans as rapists and murderers. (And some, he assumed, were ok.) We are living in the same world that also houses Brock Turner. On January 18, 2015 Turner raped an unconscious woman. He was convicted of his crime. The presiding judge, Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky, sentenced Brock to 6 months in jail. A year since that ruling, Judge Persky has finally decided to explain himself. ““I have a reputation for being fair to both sides,” Persky says. Let that sink in for a moment. Persky was looking at a victim of rape and the man who raped her while she was unconscious. And Persky prides himself on being fair to both sides. He is running for reelection. I’d like to say that there’s no chance Persky will get reelected, but we are living in a Trump world. He might.

I ran into this article at Mother Jones about men taking credit for women’s work. (Last week Bernie Sanders embraced Hillary Clinton’s public option healthcare plan. It was the same plan he and his Bros previously excoriated Clinton for. But now Sanders is taking credit for it, and some in the media are happily giving him credit. Sanders also previously embraced Hillary’s college tuition plan after being vehemently against it. The  media gave him credit for Hillary’s plan too.) Mother Jones digs far, back to cave paintings. Newest research suggests they were painted by women. From Mary Shelley to Ada Lovelace to the rapper M.I.A. and singer Taylor Swift – the more things change, the more men continue to take credit for women’s work. (Remember when Michael Moore claimed to be the leader of the Resistance? Yeah, no Michael Moore. You’re NOT the Resistance.)

We’ve all heard the word “mansplain.” It’s a word that has entered the lexicon fairly quickly. I didn’t even notice it, it was just sort of there. I did not realize it originated with a 2008 essay “Men Explain Things To Me” by Rebecca Solnit. Solnit related an anecdote that at a party she got into a discussion with a man who had heard Solnit was an author. She began to tell him about her latest book about Eadweard Muybridge and the man interrupted her to inform her that just last year a new and popular book about Muybridge came out. Had she heard of it? It so happens that she had. Solnit wrote it.

And finally: on June 26th we celebrated the 20th anniversary since the publishing of the first Harry Potter novel: “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone.” (Retitled “The Sorcerer’s Stone” in the US.) Joanne Rowling famously started jotting down the novel onJK-Rowling a napkin in an Edinburgh cafe when she was a single mother and broke, living on welfare. She finished the manuscript on an old-fashioned typewriter. It was rejected by 12 publishers. Finally a small children’s publisher Bloomsbury accepted. They asked Rowling to create a gender-neutral name because a novel about a boy wizard was likely to sell better if boys didn’t know a woman had written it. So Joanne became J.K. Rowling. Bloomsbury printed 500 copies of the original hardcover (now worth a fortune!) 300 of those copies were sent to libraries and only 200 into the wild. The rest, of course, is history. Over the course of seven novels Rowling’s story of the boy wizard and his best friends Ron and Hermione’s struggles against forces of evil have inspired generations of children and adults. Movies and a play made billions. Rowling herself became a billionaire (Forbes claims she is the first writer to make a billion dollars from writing alone), and at one point Rowing was proclaimed to be richer than the Queen of England. However, Rowling gave away so much to charity that Forbes had to remove her from their list of billionaires. She is currently said to have only about $840,000,000.

-Trump Chuckie

On March 4th, The Thing in the White House sent out a bunch of angry tweets blasting the previous President for wiretapping Isengard Trump Tower. “Terrible! Just found out that Obama had my “wires tapped” in Trump Tower just before the victory. Nothing found. This is McCarthyism!” Then 30 mins later: “How long has President Obama gone to tapp my phones during the very sacred election process? This is Nixon/Watergate. Bad (or sick) guy!” When asked to clarify this insanity, The Thing’s minions really could do nothing but heee and hawww. The Thing read it somewhere, they said. NY Times! Louise Mensch! BBC! Naturally once reporters dug deeper, they found that NO, none of those reports talked Trump Obamaabout wiretapping. Mensch broke the story on her right-wing blog HeatStreet on November 7th about the FISA warrant, but all she said was that a FISC court granted permission to “examine the activities of ‘U.S. persons’ in Donald Trump’s campaign with ties to Russia.” In question was a mysterious communication between two Russian banks and a server in Trump Tower. (David Corn of Mother Jones broke the story of the two banks and Trump Tower, but all media dismissed it as a bizarre conspiracy theory a couple of weeks earlier.) In the follow-up reports to Mensch’s story, BBC and the failing NY Times confirmed a FISA warrant, but nobody mentioned wiretaps… except Breitbart and then The Thing in its Tweets. Ahhhhh, the plot thickens. Where did Breitbart get the information about wiretaps at Trump Tower and did The Thing just leak top secret information in a series of Tweets? Sure seems that way. Will anybody hold him accountable? LOL.

There are fleeing moments when it feels like Lady Lindsey Graham and Hero John McCain might hold The Thing accountable for the numerous impeachable offenses it has committed. Earlier today Graham tweeted: “An attack on one political party should be considered an attack on all. We must push back on Russian election interference at home & abroad.” That sounds great! However it should also be noted that Graham had lunch with The Thing earlier in the day.

“Great lunch meeting with ‪@POTUS today. President Trump is strongly committed to rebuilding our military which is music to my ears. (1/3)

President Trump is in deal-making mode and I hope Congress is like-minded. (2/3)”

“How good was the meeting with ‪@POTUS?

I gave him my NEW cell phone number.”

Somebody responded: “1-800-DOOR-MAT?” And then “You, sir, are a profile in courage.”

And that, folks, is Lindsey Graham summarized in a handful of tweets. We have to get used to the notion that no, Graham and McCain won’t hold The Thing accountable for anything until they’ve gotten what they want from him: tax cuts for the rich, bigger military, gutting ACA, etc. etc. etc. Then maybe, possibly, once that’s all done, they’ll throw The Thing overboard.

Speaking of handing out cell numbers, can anybody afford a new cell phone after Republicans pass Trumpcare? Jason Chaffetz, the man who investigated Benghazi and Hillary Clinton’s e-mails to death, and who doesn’t think there is any reason to look into Trump’s connections to Russia, went on CNN to start selling Trumpcare to America.

Americans have choices. And they’ve got to make a choice. And so, maybe rather than getting that new iPhone that they just love and they want to go spend hundreds of dollars on, maybe they should invest it in their own health care. They’ve got to make those decisions for themselves.

This is, of course, patently absurd. An iPhone unsubsidized by a phone company might cover one month’s premium for a single person. How many iPhones does Chaffetz think people buy? Of course, Chaffetz himself doesn’t have to buy his own phone. He gets one from work. His cell bill gets covered too. “How much does an iPhone cost” is the new “How much is a gallon of milk?” and Chaffetz doesn’t know  the cost of either.

Medicaire

Overall Trumpcare is going to gut poor people into oblivion. It gives tax breaks to the rich, provides insurance companies with tax deductions on CEO salaries, will raise costs of premium, reinstate caps, gut preexisting conditions. Millions of people will lose their insurance. Many of them were Trump voters. Sadly many of them were not. But they will suffer also.

Why do Republicans hate poor people? It’s a question that has been asked often and there are many answers. As it came up again in the current Trumpcare discussion, I was reminded of a scene in E.M. Forster’s great novel “Howards End.” In the 1910 novel ForsterForster explored 3 groups of people from 3 different classes: the extremely wealthy and conservative Wilcoxes, upper middle class but liberal Schlegels, and poor but aspiring for something bigger Basts. The Schlegel sisters, Margaret and Helen, try to help poor Leonard Bast, but their well-meaning interventions in his life, as well as not-well meaning interventions from the Wilcoxes, prove disastrous. He loses his job as a clerk in an insurance company after following bad advice from patriarch Henry Wilcox. When the impetuous Helen (played by Helena Bonham Carter in the magnificent film, with Emma Thompson as Margaret) tries to make her case for helping the poor to the condescending 1%-er Henry Wilcox (Anthony Hopkins in the film), the following exchange takes place. Written in 1910, “Howards End”is still relevant in 2017.

From Chapter 22

He [Henry Wilcox] raised his finger. “Now, a word of advice.”

“I require no more advice.” [said Helen]

“A word of advice. Don’t take up that sentimental attitude over the poor. See that she doesn’t, Margaret. The poor are poor, and one’s sorry for them, but there it is. As civilisation moves forward, the shoe is bound to pinch in places, and it’s absurd to pretend that any one is responsible personally. Neither you, nor I, nor my informant, nor the man who informed him, nor the directors of the Porphyrion, are to blame for this clerk’s loss of salary. It’s just the shoe pinching–no one can help it; and it might easily have been worse.”

Helen quivered with indignation.

“By all means subscribe to charities–subscribe to them largely– but don’t get carried away by absurd schemes of Social Reform. I see a good deal behind the scenes, and you can take it from me that there is no Social Question–except for a few journalists who try to get a living out of the phrase. There are just rich and poor, as there always have been and always will be. Point me out a time when men have been equal–”

“I didn’t say–”

“Point me out a time when desire for equality has made them happier. No, no. You can’t. There always have been rich and poor. I’m no fatalist. Heaven forbid! But our civilisation is moulded by great impersonal forces” (his voice grew complacent; it always did when he eliminated the personal), “and there always will be rich and poor. You can’t deny it” (and now it was a respectful voice)–“and you can’t deny that, in spite of all, the tendency of civilisation has on the whole been upward.”

“Owing to God, I suppose,” flashed Helen.

He stared at her.

“You grab the dollars. God does the rest.”

It was no good instructing the girl if she was going to talk about God in that neurotic modern way. Fraternal to the last, he left her for the quieter company of Mrs. Munt.

[…]

“Don’t ever discuss political economy with Henry,” advised her sister. “It’ll only end in a cry.”

“But he must be one of those men who have reconciled science with religion,” said Helen slowly. “I don’t like those men. They are scientific themselves, and talk of the survival of the fittest, and cut down the salaries of their clerks, and stunt the independence of all who may menace their comfort, but yet they believe that somehow good–it is always that sloppy ‘somehow’ will be the outcome, and that in some mystical way the Mr. Basts of the future will benefit because the Mr. Brits of today are in pain.”

Howards End

Also, in brief: Richard Steele, the British spy who wrote the infamous “pee pee” dossier, has resurfaced. While American Senators want to hear him testify about what he knows.

WikiLeaks is dumping top secret CIA documents.

And contrary to earlier denials that he’s never met the Russian Ambassador (a man nobody has ever met), a newly unearthed article in the Wall Street Journal from last April says that Trump met with the Russian Ambassador and greeted him warmly.

What’s on your mind Widdershins? This is an open thread.

[MB: Yes, it’s me again. I’m taking over for Chat today.]

As I mentioned yesterday, I’ve been reading a lot about women’s history lately. And guess what’s the same as it ever was? Unequal pay for equal work.

Back in the antebellum period, prior to the Civil War, there was the concept of “separate spheres” for men and women. Men ruled over the public sphere (which meant political and work life), and women, the domestic sphere (which meant, home life). This didn’t really work as advertised, because the wimminz didn’t actually “rule” anything in the household. They married into the sphere (or didn’t), but then essentially became unpersons, completely wrapped in their husbands’ identity. They had no rights to their own property, had very few options for divorce, and could not even claim their own children should their husbands become violent or negligent. This was due to the existence of Blackstone’s law, which we “inherited” from our founding English fathers.

By marriage, the husband and wife are one person in law: that is, the very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least is incorporated and consolidated into that of the husband; under whose wing, protection, and cover, she performs every thing; and is therefore called in our law-French a feme-covert, foemina viro co-operta; is said to be covert-baron, or under the protection and influence of her husband, her baron, or lord; and her condition during her marriage is called her coverture. Upon this principle, of a union of person in husband and wife, depend almost all the legal rights, duties, and disabilities, that either of them acquire by the marriage. I speak not at present of the rights of property, but of such as are merely personal. For this reason, a man cannot grant anything to his wife, or enter into covenant with her: for the grant would be to suppose her separate existence; and to covenant with her, would be only to covenant with himself: and therefore it is also generally true, that all compacts made between husband and wife, when single, are voided by the intermarriage.

So much for that pre-nup, eh, ladies?

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Our Fredster is under the weather, and needs some encouragement.  Let’s spend this Sunday fostering his recovery in all sorts of media.    Feel free to send him songs, movies, books, poetry – whatever moves you.  Surround him with healing messages, and let’s get him up and going.  The holidays are coming, which means that bowl games will soon follow,  and this is not the time to be in the bed sick.

My five suggestions are all musical, but feel free to use the media of your choice in this otherwise open thread.

(1) Get Well Soon – Reggie and the Full Effect

(2) Feeling Stronger Everyday – Chicago

(3) What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Stronger – Kelly Clarkson

(4)  Better Days – The Goo-Goo Dolls

(5) Jeremiah Peabody’s Pills– Ray Stevens

Katniss faces her moment of truth

Seen any good movies lately, all? Now that I live in the semi-suburbs, I am actually able to go to movies on their opening weekend without standing in line overnight. 😆 Last weekend, I went to see “The Hunger Games.”

I did read all three books in the series by Suzanne Collins, and found them imaginative, wonderfully written, and rather feminist in orientation. The story of a young girl who holds on to her humanity in the face of a brutal, unfeeling dystopia that is trying to kill her (literally in this case)…well, what could be more evocative of the modern War On Women? The books could be interpreted in many ways, but I did think that at the core, it was about the idea of the traditionally “feminine” values of nesting, community and peace, combating with the traditionally “masculine” values of travel, self-promotion and conflict. (I also saw some hommages to Ray Bradbury in the series, which made me appreciate it even more.)

All this is to say that the movie more than did justice to the books. The female protagonist, Katniss Everdeen, is played by the young actress Jennifer Lawrence (best known for the well-beloved indie “Winter’s Bone,”) who truly seems to fathom the depth of the character she is playing. Memorable appearance are made by Donald Sutherland, Woody Harrelson, Elizabeth Smart and Wes Bentley (of “American Beauty”). The boys warring for Katniss’ heart are played by young hunks I am far too old to appreciate. 😉

In any case, in honor of the triumphant screen arrival of a new young feminist character, let’s serve some drinks and munch some popcorn and other movie snacks. Don’t be mad, Widdershins, but hubby and I are going on a date tonight, so I won’t be around much. You have my permission to play nicely without “Mommie,” as Fredster called me. Just don’t stain the carpets too much, especially if Uppity stops by with her famous chicken marsala! 😆

This is an open thread…and may the odds be ever in your favor.

Widdershins, it’s about eleventy thousand degrees outside and the air is not safe for children and old people. We need an early escape package, w

hat with so many of us “gone fishin’!” Couple that with a fun opinion piece I saw over at Uppity’s, and you have the inspiration for today’s post. So, without further ado, here are my current fictional favorites – from the modern canon only…

  1. Hermione Granger, the Harry Potter series. I admit it – I’ve read all of the Harry Potter books, and will be seeing the final film this weekend. Not only does Hermione have a handbag that will hold my laptop, my evening shoes and my husband, but she is about the bad-assed-est witch in the entire magical canon. Some people even feel SHE, not Harry, should be the main character. Via Lorac at Uppity’s place:

    In preparation for the final movie, I’m rewatching all of the films to date (thanks, ABC Family, for that well-timed marathon last weekend and sorry, my DVR, for taking up so much space). In the middle of Prisoner of Azkaban last night (I’ll admit that I had this thought before last night) I had a revelation.

    The books should be named after Hermione Granger.

    Yes, yes, sad times about that whole your parents thing dying, Harry. Please see the condolences card I sent you 12 YEARS AGO for my sympathy. In the meantime, look at how many people are COMING OUT OF THE WOODWORK to be your new mentor. Even McGonagle is like, “hey kid, here is a free fancy broom. Just because that one time when your parents died and you’re good at catching shit.”

    On the other side of the common room, we have Hermione. Who is muggle born, which means she simply doesn’t have that same built-in support as Harry. She can’t go home to her parents and talk about how people keep trying to kill her because her parents just wouldn’t understand. And while she’s at school, instead of having every single teacher fall over their magic wand to get on her good side, she’s held down. People won’t stop talking about her Muggle parents and it’s all she can do to keep up her studies. By which I mean, BEING BETTER THAN ALL OF THE SCHOOL.

    And when Snape assigns homework, Harry is all “Wah-Wah, there is sport tomorrow, fulfilling my responsibly will be so hard.” MEANWHILE Hermione is MOVING FUCKING TIME so she can take more classes. Because girl knows SOMETHING is happening and she needs to STUDY THE EFF UP.

    When the time comes around to fight, the boys are like, “oh wow, look at this thing that happened. Isn’t that crazy” while Hermione is like, “idiots, I figured that out like 5 books ago. CAN YOU PLEASE FOCUS.”And after she saves the day and just about everyone in the entire book/series/magical world tells her that she’s “the smartest witch for her age,” is it Hermione who finally gets the fancy broom? Of course not. SWOOP IN AN STEAL THE GLORY AGAIN, HORRIBLE HARRY.

    Not sure I agree, but it is a thought-provoking opinion, no? Personally I feel J.K. Rowling knew what she was doing when she made Harry the main character. I’m guessing the person who wrote that never lost a parent, but it is a life-changing experience. There is before, and then there is after. It will make or break you.

  2. Jane Rizzoli and Maura Isles, of Rizzoli & Isles.  If you haven’t caught this show yet, you really should. Author Tess Gerritsen originated these ladies (Rizzoli the intuitive, tomboyish cop, Isles the exceedingly brilliant medical examiner), but this series is lighter, funnier, and possesses an incredible chemistry between the two women. Here is a youtube compilation of some funny moments from the show. Enjoy!
  3. Brenda Leigh Johnson, The Closer. Okay, The Closer is pretty weak this season, at least so far. But Brenda Leigh is one of the most fully-realized women on TV, fake Southern accent (“thank yew”) and all, and that will never change, no matter what lame storylines the writers come up with.
  4. V.I. Warshawski, the V.I. Warshawski series. V.I. (short for Victoria Iphigenia), a private detective, is feisty, fun and rather fabulous in her sexy red heels. The movies haven’t done this lady justice yet, and I don’t know if they ever will. Perhaps TNT or USA will give it a shot – they seem to do very well with female-driven shows.
  5. Mary Shannon, In Plain Sight. Mary is a US Marshal with a family from hell and an attitude to match. Played by the incomparable Mary McCormack, Mary is about as complicated as a woman can be…and we enjoy watching her try to struggle through her difficult job and her even more difficult life.

What about you? Who are your favorites?

This is an open thread.

Honestly, I’m still too funky from losing little Stuart to wrap my head around writing  any post that y’all would wish to read.. Also, we haven’t had a “lazy” musical/movie/whatever post in awhile, so let’s do that today. Let’s talk about the movies that got us through good times and bad, the “three hankie weepers” and the inspirational flicks that made us feel better. Let’s talk about break-up songs, and songs that were uplifting. Let’s talk about relationships – the good, the bad, and the ugly. Let’s talk about great jobs and the “worst job ever”. Let’s gossip about people, places, and things.
In other words, we’ve already given my noble little Scottie a Widdershins wake, so let’s give ourselves a day off from the just plain awfulness that seems to be all around. There’s lots of good stuff out there, and our assignment is to find it.

This is an open thread.

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Our 2016 Ticket!

Our girl is gonna shine

Busted: Glass ceiling

HRC bumper sticker

She’s thinking “Less than 2 weeks I have to keep seeing that face”

Yeah I can make it

The team we’re on

Women’s March on Washington!

Right-click the pic for more info

Kellyanne Conway’s new job

So similar

Take the kids to work? NO!

3 turds control fate of healthcare for millions

That moment when *your* pussy gets grabbed