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Good Sunday Widdershins!

I don’t know about elsewhere but here in the south summer is definitely here. And I know that because when I see the temps shown they also show that awful heat index.  Then add in the humidity and ugh!

Below I’ve added some summer time “classics” .  I’m sure y’all have some that are your faves also so please add them in the comments.

Open thread of course.

(1) Summer in the City~Lovin’ Spoonful

(2) Summertime~Ella Fitzgerald/Louis Armstrong

(3) Summertime Blues~Eddie Cochran

(4) Hot Fun in the Summertime~Sly & the Family Stone

(5) Summer of ’69~Bryan Adams

(6) The Boys of Summer~Don Henley

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There you go Widdershins – six nice “summer” songs.  Share some of yours below.

Open thread of course.

 

 

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Good Sunday to you Widdershins.   With the fourth of July coming up I thought I would take another look at this post I wrote sometime back on musical marches. It’s also being reposted because I got too much shit going on right now to attempt to sit down and write anything else. There will be the usual hubbub of hot dogs, apple pie, fireworks and probably a few parades.  Those parades will probably include marching bands. Being that I was a music major in my first college incarnation, and that I was an instrumental major and also in marching band, my thoughts went to marches.  March music was and is a part of Americana.  We have had fife and drum corps, trumpet corps, all the way up to enormous marching bands today.  Musically speaking, a march  “is a piece of music with a strong regular rhythm which in origin was expressly written for marching to and most frequently performed by a military band.”.  Marches are usually written in 4/4 or 2/4 time, and the tempo is around 120 beats to the minute.

An American march (and some British – especially the marches of Kenneth J. Alford aka Lt. F. J. Ricketts) has three strains and the third one is usually referred to as the “trio”.  Marches also appear in classical and operatic music as well as what we consider the “typical” march setup.

We’ll go with the idea that “march” can be any part of the piece or song.  It can be in the title, in the lyrics or whatever.  So let’s see what everyone comes up with.  My contributions are below.

This is one of John Philip Sousa’s “lesser” marches, the King Cotton march.  You may not recognize the name but you may be familiar with the music.

Here’s another Sousa march where I’ll bet you recognize the music but did not know the name.  This is the “Liberty Bell” march.

Here’s another march, a British one time time, written by Kenneth J. Alford, the Colonel Bogey March that you probably know from the movie The Bridge over the River Kwai.  What you probably don’t know is the background for the creation of the march.

Supposedly, the tune was inspired by a military man and golfer who whistled a characteristic two-note phrase (a descending minor third interval) instead of shouting “Fore!”. It is this descending interval that begins each line of the melody. The name “Colonel Bogey” began in the later 19th century as the imaginary “standard opponent” of the Colonel Bogey scoring system, and by Edwardian times the Colonel had been adopted by the golfing world as the presiding spirit of the course. Edwardian golfers on both sides of the Atlantic often played matches against “Colonel Bogey”.Bogey is now a golfing term meaning “one over par”.

This march is entitled the “National Emblem March”.  I’ve heard this countless times but never knew who the composer was.  It was a gentleman by the name of  Edwin Eugene Bagley.

Bagley incorporates into the march the first twelve notes of The Star-Spangled Banner played by Euphoniums and Trombones and ingeniously disguised in duple rather than triple time. The rest of the notes are all Bagley’s, including the four short repeated A-flat major chords that lead to a statement by the low brass that is now reminiscent of the national anthem. Unusually, Bagley’s march does not incorporate either a break strain or a stinger.

The U.S. military uses the trio section as ceremonial music for the color guard when presenting and retiring the colors.

Another fine British march, again by Alford is “The Mad Major”.  Since Ricketts/Alford was a Lt. and the title involves a “mad” major I wonder if there was some payback here.  😉

Another Alford march with some history to it:

The vanished army was the original British Expeditionary Force which went to France in August 1914. They were all professional soldiers – regarded as the finest British army ever deployed, which was saying something! There were a mere 80,000 of them and they faced an enemy five times their number. After battles at Mons, the Marne, the Aisne and Ypres (Oct-Nov., 1914) they had fought themselves to death. Their army had vanished. This march was written by Kenneth Alford to honour them.

I’ve got two more famous Sousa marches played by “The President’s Own” U.S. Marine Corps Band.  First, “The Washington Post” March.

The last of the marches by “The March King that I selected is “The Stars and Stripes Forever”.  Here’s a little info for you.

Piccolo players play the famous obbligato in the first repeat of the trio (the one after the breakstrain). In the final repeat of the trio (grandioso), the low brass joins the piccolo players with a prominent countermelody. The official version, as played by the United States Marine Band, is performed in the key of E-flat.

Now I haven’t forgotten the vocal and operatic folks here so I’ve got this for all of you from Aida.

I know there are some more opera “marches” out there so I’m hoping our opera and vocal fans help me by adding some pieces below.

Open thread of course and hope everyone has a happy fourth of July.

Upstairs Lounge3

N O T E:

In conjunction with Pride Month I thought I would repost this piece I did sometime back.  I’m doing it after reading this article on nola.com

Note:  some of the links from the original piece may not still work

 

Monday marked the 40th anniversary of a terrible tragedy in New Orleans; the arson fire at the Upstairs Lounge in the French Quarter.  Twenty-eight men died at the scene of the fire, one died on the way to the hospital and three died later from their wounds so a total of 32 people died as a result of this arson.  All but one were men.

This post is going to have a lot of quotes pasted in so I hope you don’t mind that.  But the story needs to be told outside of nola and some of you might consider it a history lesson, while some of us lived through the times.

Essentially, here’s the story.  The Upstairs Lounge was a gay bar in the French Quarter.  This was 1973.  A lot of people (hell most people) were not out back then.  The French Quarter itself was different back then.  If you’ve been there, it wasn’t the elegant (Royal Street and its antique stores) touristy area it is now.  Rather, think in terms of what you saw if you saw the movie A Streetcar Named Desire.  It was a rundown area, filled with, as one person said, “thieves and queers”.  Many times, gay men carried fake i.d.s to the bars, not so much to prove they were over the age of 18 (the drinking age in La at the time), but in case there was a bust at the gay bar, so their real names would not be printed in the paper.

According to Frank Perez, a writer for Ambush magazine in New Orleans,

“The way things were at the time was really pretty bad. Raids of gay bars were very high and discrimination was profound,” Perez said.

A description of the Upstairs Lounge was given this way:

In 1973, the gay and lesbian scene in New Orleans was still largely underground, and patrons remember the UpStairs Lounge as not just any bar, but as a gay community hangout where locals could gather without fear of social persecution.

Songs were sung around a piano, “nellydramas” were performed with the help of local playwrights, and couples competed in tricycle races, according to former 9th Ward resident Johnny Townsend, the author of “Let the Faggots Burn: The UpStairs Lounge Fire,” a comprehensive retelling of the events of that night in 1973.

The walls of the French Quarter watering hole were covered with flocked wallpaper, adorned with memorabilia including an iconic Cosmopolitan magazine spread of Burt Reynolds lying naked on a bearskin rug.

To get into the bar, you had to ring a buzzer at the entrance on the ground level and then after you were let in, you went upstairs to the bar.  The gist of the story of the arson is this:  A local hustler and regular Rodger Nunez, had been thrown out of the bar and it was said that he remarked, “I’m gonna burn y’all out.”.  (Note: Nunez committed suicide the next year and an acquaintance of his said that when he was drunk he confessed to setting the fire but denied it when he sobered up)  The fire was determined to be arson but no one was ever arrested or convicted of the crime.

That night:

about 60 people held court at the French Quarter bar. A weekly “beer bust” had just ended, a jukebox was blaring near the entrance and people were gathered around the bar’s piano, where two men took turns banging away on the keys, as patrons joined in and sang along to “United We Stand”.

An incessant buzzing at the bar’s door, however, got the attention of bartender Buddy Rasmussen, who eventually asked 47-year-old Luther Boggs to go answer it. The buzzer was located at the street level where another door entered onto Iberville Street. Upon pushing open the lounge door, Boggs was met with a wall of fire that had been building in the stairway, causing flames to explode into the bar, instantly setting the whole place ablaze.

Rasmussen, an Air Force veteran, was able to lead about 20 people to safety through a rear door near the stage, which led out onto the roof of the building.

Read the rest of this entry »

Good Weekend Widdershins

So to continue on the theme of last weekend’s post of some favorite tunes (and also because I don’t have the foggiest idea of what to write [and that’s because I’ve probably been doing this too long] ) I’ve decided to share some more of my favorite songs from a long time ago and probably in another galaxy.

So away we go.

(1) Janis Joplin~Me and Bobby McGee

(2) Eagles~Lyin’ Eyes

(3) Janis (again) Mercedes Benz

(4) Boston~More Than A Feeling

(5) Eagles~Hotel California

(6) E L P (Emerson Lake and Palmer) Lucky Man

(7) The Moody Blues~Tuesday Afternoon

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Okay shinners, a few more of my faves.  Feel free to share some of your own in the comments.

Or not.

Open thread.

 

Good Weekend Widdershins!

This post will have to last us a few days, oh say, maybe until Thursday.  As MB told us she has her house sold and will be making her move to the Left Coast.  I am keeping fingers crossed that I will be making a similar move to the Gulf Coast soon. (Ha!  Just in time for hurricane season)

You will recall that a few days ago I played the Randy Newman song Louisiana 1927.

I had been listening to that song on YouTube and somehow, in some convoluted manner also ended up listening to Edith Piaf and then to Irma Thomas, a Nola singer who is known as the New Orleans Queen of Soul.

The Piaf…now that brought back some memories.  Memories of sitting around in a college dorm room listening to her, smoking cigarettes and trying to act like French or Parisian sophisticates.  LOL

So, I’m going to put in some Piaf songs and a couple that Irma is well known for.

Do y’all have any favorite songs you still like to listen to?  If so, please include them here.  All types and genres are welcomed.

(1) La Vie En Rose

(2) Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien

(3) Milord (one of my favorites)

(4) Mon Dieu

(5) L’Accordeoniste (I don’t think anything could sound more French than this)

*** Ms Thomas***

Now this first song, Irma used to sing this at The Country Club a **very** gay spot prior to Katrina.  Once when she sang this there was some drunken queen who had broken up with a boyfriend who shouted out “Sing it gurl!  You been through this and you know what it feels like”. This is also considered her “theme” song.

(6) Irma Thomas ~ It’s Raining

(7) Irma Thomas ~ Breakaway

(8) Irma Thomas  ~ Time Is On My Side (also covered by the Rolling Stones)

Okie doke shinners, that’s it for me.  Please feel free to add your contributions below.

Open thread of course.

 

 

Tags: , ,

 

Okay, here’s’ the deal:  We’ve all got shit to do so here’s a new post to go wherever you wish to go with it. The Cali primary is today along with those of several other states so perhaps that’s something to talk about.

 

With deepest apologies Widdershins, I really haven’t had the time to sit down and pull together a musical or movie post for this weekend.  So instead I’ve gathered up some political cartoons of the past week and will share them here.

Naturally a number of them concern Roseanne, Trump, and the off-again/on-again summit.

Enjoy.

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Okay Widdershins, hope y’all enjoyed these, courtesy of The Week.

Naturally an open thread to comment as you wish.

 


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Kellyanne Conway’s new job

Take the kids to work? NO!

That moment when *your* pussy gets grabbed

You go gurl! h/t Adam Joseph

“The” Book

Nice picture of our gal

Time till the Grifter in Chief is Gone

Hopefully soonerJanuary 21st, 2021
2.4 years to go.

Mueller Time!

Wise Words from Paul Ryan

B-I-N-G-O!

Only the *best* politicans bought by the NRA

Marching for their lives

Perfect Picture

Rudy: oh shit the pee tape IS real!

Need Reminders?

Never too early to shop for Christmas

“Look this way”

Manafort’s Jail Photo

Indeed who?

Trump spam

IOW Dumb = Happy?

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