The Widdershins

Archive for May 3rd, 2018

Did You Know?

Posted on: May 3, 2018

This week my post will be non Dump related. Our comments will follow the latest news, but I thought I’d do something a little different to take our mind off the bananananity of our lives. It’s a “Did You Know?” of interesting facts you may not know about. So let’s dive in and maybe learn a thing or two (I didn’t know any of these things.)

Did you know that Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa is estimated to be worth about $780 814px-Leonardo_da_Vinci,_Salvator_Mundi,_c.1500,_oil_on_walnut,_45.4_×_65.6_cm.jpgmillion? (Seems cheap, no?) But since it’s not for sale and never will be it’s unclear how much someone would actually be willing to pay for it. I’m sure an auction would bring the price into the billions. The most expensive painting ever actually sold and bought is da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi, painted in around the year 1500 of our lord. It sold in 2017 for $450.3 million. The seller? Dmitry Robolovlev. Yes, the same guy who bought Trump’s worthless Florida house for tens of millions more than it was worth…

Did you know that the German chocolate cake is named after an English-American baker Sam German, not the country??

Did you know that the chainsaw was invented to aid in childbirth. Think about that for a minute. The instrument of horror in horror movies was invented in 1830 by a German (naturally) orthopedist Bernhard Heine. Heine made a prototype for cutting bone and by late 18th century two Scottish doctors revised the instrument to aid in symphysiotomy (widening of the pelvis to help the baby move out.)

Did you know that the last letter added to the English alphabet was the letter J and it is located next to the letter I because it looks almost the same?

Did you know that the Citicorp building in Manhattan, built in 1977 and designed by IMG_4597-copy-3-1024x768.jpgWilliam J. LeMessurier, was destined to be blown down by the wind if Diane Hartley, an enterprising architecture student, didn’t notice the flaw in its design? The building has an unusual structure – its 9 story columns stand in the center not the corners of the building to make room for a Church that was there first. It looks cool, right? Now think about winds: there are two types of winds – winds that blow at the corners and winds that blow directly at a wall, and all buildings take into account strong winds, so the building doesn’t collapse in a storm. LeMessurier accounted for the winds by installing a gigantic weight at the top that would swing in the opposite direction of the building in a storm and keep it balanced. After this Citicorp building was already opened and occupied, Mr. LeMessurier got a phone call from an assistant who had a phone call from a young architecture student (Diane Lee Hartley) writing a thesis on the building and she noticed that LeMessurier did not account for the winds that would blow at the corners of the building. Typically buildings are strongest at their corners, so it wouldn’t be an issue. But this was not an ordinary building. It had no support at the corners which would have made it vulnerable to strong winds blowing at the corners and there was a high chance (1 in 16) that the building would eventually collapse from a storm. And there was a

diane-hartley-e1397598824849-600x482

Diane Lee Hartley in 2014

Hurricane Ella making its way towards the island! In the middle of the night, in secret to prevent panic, the architects worked to fix the mistake, and the NYPD and emergency services coordinated an evacuation plan within a 10 block radius in case the building collapsed. 2500 Red Cross volunteers were on stand-by. The good news is that Hurricane Ella never made it to Manhattan and the building was reinforced without its occupants even knowing they were in danger.

Did you know that “a buttload” is an actual measurement of weight?

Did you know that opening a barrel of whiskey is called “drilling the bunghole?”

And if I were to ask you what is the most perfect day in the history of the world, what would you say? I’m beginning to think that the most perfect day in the history of the world was April 18, 1930. Why? Well, it was so perfect that there was literally no news to report. A BBC News announcer came on the air at 20:45 and said: “There is no news.” And with the remaining 15 minutes of the broadcast the BBC played music.

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Kellyanne Conway’s new job

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That moment when *your* pussy gets grabbed

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